Veterans’ service dogs getting veterinary benefits

Tim Shelton, director of the American Legion Riders Florida Chapter 137, and Justice, a Golden puppy trained by Patroit Service Dogs appear in this 2010 file  photo.  (The Florida Times-Union, Don Burk)

Tim Shelton, director of the American Legion Riders Florida Chapter 137, and Justice, a Golden puppy trained by Patroit Service Dogs appear in this 2010 file photo. (The Florida Times-Union, Don Burk)

The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is planning to implement veterinary health benefits for service dogs approved for veterans with a chronic impairment that substantially limits mobility associated with mental health disorders.

“We take our responsibility for the care and safety of Veterans very seriously,” said VA Under Secretary for Health, Dr. David J. Shulkin. “The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is committed to providing appropriate, safe and effective, compassionate care to all veterans. Implementing the veterinary health benefit for mobility service dogs approved for Veterans with a chronic impairment that substantially limits mobility associated with mental health disorders may prove to be significantly beneficial for some Veterans.  The Service Dog Benefits Pilot will evaluate this premise.”

VA has been providing veterinary benefits to veterans diagnosed as having visual, hearing or substantial mobility impairments and whose rehabilitation and restorative care is clinically determined to be optimized through the assistance of a guide dog or service dog.

With this pilot, this benefit is being provided to veterans with a chronic impairment that substantially limits mobility associated with a mental health disorder for whom the service dog has been identified as the optimal way for the veteran to manage the mobility impairment and live independently.

Service dogs are distinguished from pets and comfort animals because they are specially trained to perform tasks or work for a specific individual with a disability who cannot perform the task or accomplish the work independently.

To be eligible for the veterinary health benefit, the service dog must be trained by an organization accredited by Assistance Dogs International in accordance with VA regulations.

Currently, 652 veterans with approved guide or service dogs receive the veterinary service benefit. This Pilot is anticipated to provide the veterinary service benefit to up to 100 additional Veterans with a chronic impairment that substantially limits mobility associated with a mental health disorder.

The VA veterinary service benefit includes comprehensive wellness and sick care (annual visits for preventive care, maintenance care, immunizations, dental cleanings, screenings, etc.), urgent/emergent care, prescription medications, and care for illnesses or disorders when treatment enables the dog to perform its duties in service to the veteran.

Additional information about VA’s service dog program can be found athttp://www.prosthetics.va.gov/ServiceAndGuideDogs.asp


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