NJ Sandy Recovery Fails To Consider Long-Term Climate Predictions

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Hurricane Sandy destroyed homes, piers, and retaining walls at the Jersey Shore. A construction crew rebuilt this retaining wall in Brielle and reinforced it with dirt last December. (Photo by Wendell A. Davis Jr./FEMA)

Hurricane Sandy destroyed homes, piers, and retaining walls at the Jersey Shore. A construction crew rebuilt this retaining wall in Brielle and reinforced it with dirt last December. (Photo by Wendell A. Davis Jr./FEMA)

by Scott Gurian / NJ Spotlight

Climate models predict more intense storms, and sea levels from Sea Bright to Cape May could rise as much as three-and-a-half feet by the end of the century, compounded by the fact that the Jersey Shore is slowly sinking. So the sort of flooding that took place during Sandy could become much more common.

But while other coastal states are considering weather predictions up to a hundred years in the future in their current planning efforts, New Jersey has so far been more focused on the short-term recovery. Beyond setting baseline regulations, the Christie administration has left many of the planning decisions up to individual municipalities in a nod to the strong tradition of home rule that exists in the Garden State.

Read the full story at NJ Spotlight


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