Superstorm Sandy: Following The Money, Assessing NJ’s Recovery One Year Later

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A business owner looks at an information flyer at a Business Recovery Form held in Perth Amboy last December. FEMA and Small Business Administration provided information to business owners affected by Hurricane Sandy. (Photo by Patsy Lynch/FEMA)

A business owner looks at an information flyer at a Business Recovery Form held in Perth Amboy last December. FEMA and Small Business Administration provided information to business owners affected by Hurricane Sandy. (Photo by Patsy Lynch/FEMA)

by Scott Gurian / NJ Spotlight

Sandy was without a doubt the most destructive storm to hit New Jersey in modern times, causing dozens of deaths, damaging or destroying nearly 350,000 buildings, and leaving 7 million residents in the dark. Official estimates put statewide losses at around $37 billion, but one recent study speculated that once factors like loss of economic activity and tourism dollars, borrowing costs, infrastructure repairs, and storm mitigation are taken into account, the cost could rise billions or even tens of billions higher.

Assessing the state of the recovery one year later is hard to do. There are plenty of anecdotes from shore residents to go around, but it’s hard to get a sense of the big picture. Building construction permit numbers don’t really tell the story, since there’s no way to separate figures of houses being rebuilt as a result of the storm from homes that would have been built anyway. And while vacant lots abound in places like Union Beach, there is no data available on a statewide level to indicate just how many people have yet to return to their homes. The Ocean County Planning Board did estimate recently, however, that it could be as high as 26,000 residences countywide.

Read the full story at NJ Spotlight


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