NJ Senate Approves Bill To Give Adoptees Access To Birth Records

NJTODAY.NET's online business directory

TRENTON – The state Senate approve a bill sponsored by Senator Joseph F. Vitale and Majority Leader Loretta Weinberg which would give adoptees in New Jersey access to their medical history and birth records on Thursday.

“Knowing who you are and where you came from is a right that all people deserve,” said Vitale, D-Middlesex. “But without access to original birth certificates, many adoptees are left in the dark regarding their family medical, cultural and social history. Without this information, adoptees are often put at a disadvantage when it comes to making informed health decisions. Providing these men and women with access to this vital information by no means compromises the privacy of the birth parent, but instead provides adoptees with valuable insight into their family history.”

The bill, S-2814, would allow for an adopted person over the age of 18, their direct descendant, sibling or spouse, an adoptive parent or guardian, or a state or federal agency to access an uncertified, long-form copy of the adoptee’s original birth certificate through the New Jersey State Registrar. Additionally, the adoptive person would receive any available information regarding contact preferences with their biological parent and family history information.

The bill would provide birth parents the opportunity to supply to the state registrar their preference for contact with their biological child – whether it be direct contact, contact through an intermediary or no contact. The birth parent would be permitted to change this preference at any time through the state registrar.

“Under New Jersey’s current system, adoptees are left to fend for themselves to hunt down basic family information, all while the state has access to what these men and women are looking for,” said Weinberg, D-Bergen. “New Jersey should no longer be party to a system that denies individuals access to their families’ medical history, their place of birth or their birth parents’ preference for reconnecting. This legislation balances the desire for a birth parent to remain anonymous with the adoptees need for vital health records.”

The bill would require that when a birth parent submits a document of contact preference to the state registrar that they also submit family history information. A birth parent whose preferences is to have no contact with the adoptive person would be encouraged to update their family history once every ten years until they reach the age of 40, and once every five years thereafter. The state registrar would be required, under the bill, to supply adopted persons with any updated information as it is added to the file.

The bill would also require the New Jersey Department of Health to run a national public service campaign to encourage individuals to participate in the initiatives under the bill and to inform adopted persons that they can gain access to their long-form birth certificates.

The bill was approved by the Senate with a vote of 30-8. It must now head to the General Assembly for further consideration.

Connect with NJTODAY.NET

Join NJTODAY.NET's free Email List to receive occasional updates delivered right to your email address!
Email ads@njtoday.net for advertising information Send stuff to NJTODAY.NET Like Us On Facebook Follow Us On Twitter Download this week's issue of NJTODAY.NET

1 comment for “NJ Senate Approves Bill To Give Adoptees Access To Birth Records

  1. Mary O'Shea
    June 22, 2013 at 10:45 am

    Thank you Senator Weinberg and Senator Vitale. Adopted adults are still being treated as children in New Jersey. Adults vote, adults that are in the military, adults that are policemen, adults that are fireman, adults that are teachers, All of these adults make sound decisions every day. Adults that should have a right to know the name that they were born with, adults that should have the right to know the names of their parents, adults that should know if they have siblings, adults that should know their family medical history. When adoption records were sealed, it was done retroactively back in time. My father was placed as an indentured child with the family that ultimately adopted him. This happened in NYC. He was placed in 1919 and was not adopted until 1932. He enter the US Navy in 1937 and remained there until 1957. In 1978 he attempted to obtain a US Passport and could not because he had no birth certificate. He traveled the world with the Navy without a passport and now had great difficult getting one. He died in 1983 without ever knowing who he was. But I work every day to find out for him and for my family who their grandfather was. DNA will uncover the answer for me and many others. Even today there are men and women that are dying for our country in the military and are being treated as second class citizens and not allowed to know who they are and who their parents were. Please encourage the Assembly to pass this also. Use your power for good.

Leave a Reply