Animated Films Screen At Arts Guild New Jersey

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RAHWAY — Arts Guild New Jersey will present a screening of animated short films on Jan. 15, 2011, at 8 p.m. The screening will be held at 1670 Irving Street in Rahway.  Doors open at 7:30 p.m.; admission is $3 per person at the door.  Seating is limited.  The screening is wheelchair accessible.

Nineteen films varying in technique, style, and subject, will be shown.  Movies range in spirit from light-hearted to macabre, humorous to pensive. Some films are entirely digitally animated, while others are made using stop motion, hand drawing, claymation, collage elements, or a combination of animation processes.

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Many of the animations have been screened at festivals around the world, winning numerous awards and honors.  There are also films by a number of talented young animators whose work is already receiving accolades from critics and reviewers.

Filmmakers include: Lizzi Akana, Jake Armstrong, Joaquín Baldwin, Tim Beckhardt, Bryan Brinkman, Rob Carter, Danny Kang, Seth Kendall, Andy & Carolyn London (London Squared Productions), Lucas Martell, William Randolph Oliwa, Dan Pinto, Jonathan Seligson, Molly Schwartz, Katie Wendt, and Jane Wu.

Featured films:

Pigeon: Impossible   Writer/Director/Producer/Animator: Lucas Martell

Pigeon: Impossible is the tale of Walter, a rookie secret agent faced with a problem seldom covered in basic training: what to do when a curious pigeon gets trapped inside your multi-million dollar, government-issued nuclear briefcase.

Marvelous Keen Looney Bin   Director/Animator: Lizzi Akana

Balloon headed monkeys mingle with faceless children, talking loaves of bread harass an irritable baker, and limbless Christmas shoppers share an awkward exchange.

Confession   Director/Animator: Dan Pinto

A true tale of love and loss set in Junior High.

Pellet Gunn   Director/Animator: Tim Beckhardt

A dog, a cyclops, and others kill some time with the help of wormholes and hobbyist self-modification.

99¢ Travelogue    Director: Molly Schwartz Sound: Eric Elbe

A 99-second animated video travelogue gliding through an eerily compressed world built of plastic animals, construction paper drawings, eraser forests and brightly colored synthetics from the densely crowded 99¢ store landscape.

Stone on Stone   Artist: Rob Carter

This stop-motion video animation uses the architectural language of High Gothic and Modernism to invent a contradictory history of their evolvement. The theme starts and finishes with the Cathedral Church of Saint John the Divine, located on the upper west side of Manhattan. This vast anachronistic building lies unfinished and partially ruined after over a century of intermittent construction and restoration. It is contrasted with Le Corbusier’s La Tourette monastery in France, completed in 1960. The video uses this anomalous, but single-minded, architectural vision as the foundation for a new emergence of Gothic religious expression, resulting in a complete and unified fantasy cathedral – akin to the building that the Church of Saint John the Divine might have aspired to be.

The Back Brace   Directors/Animators: Andy & Carolyn London

Puberty sucks. Particularly if you’re a teenage boy diagnosed with scoliosis and forced by your zealously well-intentioned parents to wear a back brace. This is the tragic and awkward world of Carolyn and Andy London’s autobiographical short. “The Back Brace” is a chronicle of puberty, social humiliation and the perils of over-parenting.

Pudelhund   Director/Animator: Jonathan Seligson
From behind the Iron Curtain comes one in a series of educational reels meant to instruct young proles on all things canine.

Papiroflexia    Director/Animator: Joaquín Baldwin

A tale of a skillful origami paper folder who can shape the world with his hands.

The Terrible Thing of Alfa-9!   Director/Animator: Jake Armstrong

A space bounty hunter travels to a lonely planet to kill a terrible monster.

Beast of Hearts   Director/Animator: Jonathan Seligson

Subdued…A long time ago, in the distant future, a cryptic deity recounts the kismet of an alien space bat and his nemesis.

Flying Fish: Come Home Guppy   Director: Molly Schwartz  Sound: Eric Elbe

An aerial and aquatic voyage built with colored-pencil drawings, paintings and photos from the USS Nautilus in New London, CT. The Nautilus, the first US nuclear powered submarine, marked the end of the post-war (1950’s) diesel submarine fleet, known as Guppies.

Gnaritas Monstrum   Director/Animator: Seth Kendall

Gnaritas Monstrum, roughly translated as Knowledge Monster, uses symbolism and an abstract sense of time and place to represent the choices we must make in order to grow.  The two girls represent a single person, the monster, a realization of the harsher and less innocent aspects of life.  The story follows the girls through simplified stages of adolescence, from innocence and unawareness, to terror, and finally, to a courageous sacrifice of innocence, an embrace of knowledge, and growth to adulthood.

Kensho   Director/Animator: Danny Kang

A visual poem beginning as a normal day in the life of a young woman and ending in spiritual catharsis. Translating as “true self” or “true mind,” Kensho describes sudden or brief enlightenment experiences in Zen Buddhism.

Book Girl & Cabinet Girl   Director/Animator: Jane Wu

Book Girl & Cabinet Girl tells a touching story of two girls who realize the value of their friendship after a journey of broken hearts, torn pages and reconciliation.

Also featuring: Groceries by William Randolph Oliwa, In the Beginning by Katie Wendt, Experimental Abstraction, and A Fly Film, by Bryan Brinkman.

For more information, contact Arts Guild New Jersey at 732-381-7511 or email artsguild1670@verizon.net. Visit www.agnj.org for directions.


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