Alleged Gang Members Indicted

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Courtesy of NJ Attorney General's Office

TRENTON –The Division of Criminal Justice today obtained an indictment charging the leader and 18 alleged members and associates of the Nine Trey Headbustas set of the Bloods gang, Attorney General Paula T. Dow and Criminal Justice Director Stephen J. Taylor announced.

According to Taylor, the 42-count state grand jury indictment charges 19 defendants with first-degree racketeering, including Michael Anderson, 38, who allegedly led the gang from New Jersey State Prison in Trenton.

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The indictment charges three men – Syree Hakins, Davon Parker and Tyrane Mathis – with murder in the fatal shooting of gang member Devin Thompson, in New Brunswick on June 2, 2008.  They are also charged with attempted murder for allegedly shooting Thompson’s friend Christopher Whitsett in the back.  He survived.  The indictment supersedes a prior indictment related to the murder.

The racketeering charge carries a sentence of up to 20 years in prison.  Anderson and Hakins are also charged in separate counts with promoting organized street crime, which carries a sentence of 15 to 30 years in prison.  The indictment alleges that between July 2005 and November 2009, the defendants committed and conspired to commit crimes for the gang, including murder, robbery, aggravated assault, weapons offenses, witness tampering, money laundering and possession and/or distribution of cocaine, heroin, ecstasy and marijuana. The criminal activities extended into Mercer, Hudson, Essex, Passaic, Camden and Cumberland Counties.

The indictment stems from “Operation Hardhat,” an investigation that began in 2007 and was conducted by the New Jersey Department of Corrections Special Investigation Division, the State Police Street Gang North Unit, the Division of Criminal Justice Gangs & Organized Crime Bureau, the Middlesex County Prosecutor’s Office and the New Brunswick Police Department, with the assistance of numerous other law enforcement agencies.  Anderson and 17 other defendants were initially charged by complaint warrant in April 2010.

“This is the second major indictment we have brought against Anderson for allegedly directing the criminal activities of the Nine Trey Headbustas from New Jersey State Prison,” said Dow. “Just last week, he pleaded guilty to leading a narcotics trafficking network in Camden, a plea that will mean he will serve at least another 10 years in prison without parole. Once again, through this new indictment, he faces very serious charges.”

“The Division of Criminal Justice will continue to work with the State Police and Department of Corrections to target gang leaders who seek to generate crime and violence in our communities from behind bars,” said Taylor. “In August, we had seven years added to the 30-year murder sentence being served by David “Duke” Allen, the leader of the Nine Trey Gangsters set of the Bloods, because he attempted to lead his gang from New Jersey State Prison.”

“Communications between jailed gang leaders and members on the street will continue to be disrupted as police and Corrections fight this battle together.  Cooperation among agencies at the state and local levels will isolate people such as Anderson, and relegate them to the status of former gang leaders,” said Colonel Rick Fuentes, Superintendent of the New Jersey State Police.

Anderson holds the title of “Godfather” as the highest ranking member of this faction of the Bloods, authorities said. He is incarcerated in New Jersey State Prison on a sentence for death by auto and eluding police. The investigation revealed that he directed and supervised gang activities outside the prison.  Anderson communicated with gang members on the outside by means of multi-party phone calls in which he would give orders to subordinates.

Anderson allegedly controlled the distribution of narcotics, dictated promotions of members, and directed that “discipline,” including acts of violence, be meted out against members who went against his rule.  He also demanded that money be collected from members to keep his prison phone account active.  Several counts of the indictment charged acts of violence or planned acts of violence allegedly directed by Anderson as discipline against gang members or associates, including defendants named in this case.

Last Friday, Oct. 29, Anderson pleaded guilty in Superior Court in Camden to a first-degree charge of leading a narcotics trafficking network, which was contained in a prior indictment obtained by the Division of Criminal Justice in 2008. He admitted that he led a narcotics ring in Camden, where the Nine Trey Headbustas set was dealing large quantities of heroin in the Broadway Avenue business district, and on Stevens and Benson Streets.  The state will recommend that he be sentenced to 20 years in prison, including 10 without possibility of parole. That plea does not address the charges filed against Anderson in the indictment returned today.

At one point, detectives working on Operation Hardhat obtained intelligence that enabled state troopers and Jersey City Police to prevent an armed robbery allegedly planned by Nine Trey Headbustas members Darryl Gilbert, Terriek Hammonds, and Teisha Boundurant.  They were stopped on Aug. 29, 2008 in a stolen car and allegedly were in possession of a double barrel, sawed-off shotgun and a black facemask. The indictment charges them with conspiracy, weapons offenses and receiving stolen property in that incident.  A fourth defendant, Dorean Wheeler, is also charged in the conspiracy.

The indictment is merely an accusation and the defendants are presumed innocent until proven guilty.

The indictment was handed up to Superior Court Judge Linda R. Feinberg in Mercer County, who assigned the case to Hudson County.


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