NJ Judiciary Celebrates Constitution Day With New Web Resources For Kids

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STATE — Do you know how many cases are filed in New Jersey’s municipal courts each year?

Do you know how citizens are chosen for jury duty?

Do you know how many cases the Supreme Court is asked to review each year?

To find the answers, check the new, interactive web page for school kids on njcourts.com, the Judiciary’s website.

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Judge Glenn A. Grant, acting administrative director of the courts, launched the new kids’ site, NJ Court Kids in time for Constitution and Citizenship Day, which is observed nationally on Sept. 17, the date in 1787 that U.S. Constitution was ratified by the Constitutional Convention.

“Amid a worrisome decline in civics education in our schools and communities, we want to become a resource for the public, and especially students, to learn about their government.  Our website offers a number of helpful tools to support civics education in the classroom and at home,” said Judge Grant.

The new page includes original content specific to New Jersey’s court system, including overviews of the municipal court system, the trial court system, jury service and the Supreme Court.  Each section includes an interactive quiz that lets students test their understanding based on the readings.  The sections are geared toward middle school-aged readers and can be assigned as homework, used as a resource for research projects, or simply perused by interested readers who want to gain a better understanding of the New Jersey courts.

“Our Constitution is the oldest—and the shortest—constitution of any major nation, and the court system that it created is without a doubt the best in the world,” said Judge Grant.  “I hope that everyone will take the time on Constitution Day to learn more about our system of government, and our role as citizens.”

The kids’ page also includes links to state and federal government educational sites and bar association educational sites that provide information on the judicial branch and the legal system for students and teachers.


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