Remembering the Past: Around South Amboy Through The Years

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By Diane Norek Harrison

SOUTH AMBOY—This is from 1901 sent to me by a Woodbridge reader: The material shows the New York and Long Branch Railroad going along the Raritan Bay in South Amboy and the Morgan section of Sayreville. It shows the route of the Raritan River Railroad, which went through South Amboy and Sayreville. Also shows the Pennsylvania Railroad (Amboy Division) running through Spotswood, Helmetta into Old Bridge.

This is from material given to me by Rose and Jerry Celecki: The Board of Governors for the now gone South Amboy Memorial Hospital in 1982 were: Daniel A. Zack; President, Rosario J. Chuilli; Vice President, Raymond S. Szaro, Secretary, John F. Letts; Treasurer,  Andrew Arbes, Joseph T. Davies, Pasquale D’Esposite, John R. Everitt, Edna Chase Grey, Gerald D. Harrison, Charles W. Hoffman, M.D., William Kurtz, Jr., Wilbur Schmidt, Vernon Tice and Joseph R. Wojciechowski. The Executive Director was Eugene J. Nieto.

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This part is from material given to me: Here are some of the many businesses that I never printed before and some additional information from some that I have.  From the 1910s: Broadway- Hoffman’s Drug Store and The People’s Bakery with John Nota as the owner. First St.-Samuel K. Shinn & Son decorators and paper hangers. Henry St.-Arthur Hulse plumbing and heating contractor. Main St. Barcieri’s plumbing and heating. Tice’s on Broadway and Main St. sold any style oysters, raw, stewed or fired. They also had clam pies, chicken pies and calm chowder. Oysters were sold in shell or by quart.

In 1916, the latest popular books will be added as they are published at the A C Parisen Library.

In the 1930s: Broadway-Harry’s Clothing Store, Sara’s Hosiery Shoppe carried a complete line of men’s, women’s and children’s hosiery. The Cozy Corner with A.R. Lewis as the proprietor was selling Castle’s famous ice cream for 55 cents a quart and 25 cents a pint in 1932. Others were: Amboy Candy Shoppe, Broadway Delicatessen, Morris Taylor and Furrier, New Dress and Millinery Shop, Ray Stanton’s Cafe and Webster the Florist

David St.- Donald Pharmacy. On 4th St. was violin and mandolin instructions given by Edward J. McKenna.

Parker Ave.-Home made bread, doughnuts, crullers, pies and cakes were sold at 404 Parker Ave. with F. Niebanck the owner. They also sold clam chowder for Fridays. First St.-Tice’s Funeral Home and Albert Jerome’s Headstones and an Oyster and Chop House, in connection with Braney’s Tavern, with Ed Braney as the owner. Pine Ave.-H.D. Littell sold blue coal.

1948-Alpine St.-Fischer’s Bakery Co. Augusta St.-The Knitting Shop and George Neff, paper hanger and inside painter, no location.

1950s-Broadway-Hollywood Sales Co. (this company was later on Route 35), J & D Poultry Market was only opened Thurs, Fri. and Sat. with James Shanholtzor as the owner, Dr. Nathan Kantor, MD was located above Madura’s Pharmacy and opened in 1954 and  Nip and Tuck Store. Center St.-Damion’s Cleaning Service. First St.- Dr. H.M. Zalewski. George St. Cabinets Made To Order. Stevens Ave.-Towne Florist and Gift Shop.

Thanks to all who contributed to this column!

In 2009, Daylight Bakery, which was on Broadway for many years, closed its doors. I know many are still having withdrawals from not being able to get their jelly doughnuts, Boston cream doughnuts, rye bread and hard rolls from here. Remember the long lines on Sunday morning after the Masses let out?

If you have your own memories or past information for Carteret, Edison, Metuchen, Perth Amboy, Sayreville, South Amboy or Woodbridge you can email me at dianenorekharrison@juno.com or send “copies” of your material to me c/o CMD Media, 1139 East Jersey St., Suite 503, Elizabeth NJ, 07201.


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